Woodland management at Trelissick – Part one: The past

Regular readers of this blog will have realised long ago that woodland management is a big part of our work in the countryside, both at Trelissick and along the North Helford River, but many of you will surely have asked, ‘Why do we need to manage the woods? They have been here for many millions of…

An update from the North Helford countryside team

We are long overdue for a re-cap on all the work that has been going on out in the North Helford countryside over the winter…. New volunteers Since our last update, Charlie (the National Trust ranger for this area) has been joined by two fantastic volunteers in Andy and Cath Leaver. This couple are a real…

Grey squirrels – a major threat to our native woodland

A great deal of our woodland management at Trelissick revolves around the removal of trees that have been severely damaged by grey squirrels. Often these trees are mal-formed, stunted and feeble, leaving them unstable and unsafe, particularly when in close proximity to one of our footpaths. The consequences of the grey squirrel introduction to our…

Wassail!

Here’s to thee, old apple tree, That blooms well, bears well. Hats full, caps full, Three bushel bags full, An’ all under one tree. Hurrah! Hurrah! – Traditional wassail song There is a great deal to honor about orchards. These abundant spaces have inspired painters and poets,  folklore passed down through the ages, and provided recipes for both cooking and distillation….

Work and wildlife: a new year’s round-up

Happy new year to all our visitors at Trelissick! It has certainly been a wet and stormy festive period, with weeks of high winds and relentless heavy rainfall.   The sea wall has once again succumbed to rough waves and two sections have now collapsed. This breach has allowed the sea to pour into the bottom…

The dead-wood invertebrates

It’s apparent that a great deal of our blog posts seem to revolve around a single aspect of our work as rangers here at Trelissick: This oft-omitted subject – a source of great fascination, discussion and affection for our small countryside team – concerns the retention and protection of our dead and dying trees and the remarkable, obscure ecosystems that are…

Why are we leaf-blowing in the woods at Trelissick?!

Over the last few weeks, the countryside rangers have been vying with the wind and gradually blowing all the leaves, twigs and mud from the woodland walks. Whilst carrying out this task we have noticed our work being met with confusion, and sometimes irritation, by many of our visitors and, we must admit, it’s easy to see why! It seems…

High winds on the Trelissick estate

It’s always very sad when a great, veteran tree succumbs to a storm but it’s not necessarily the end of the road…. Recent high winds have brought down several veteran trees around the estate, including this majestic sessile oak (pictured above); a familiar presence, presiding over the bowl-shaped bottom of Nanphillows field. ‘Nanphillows’ is the name given to one…

Foraging for wild food

As the foraging season draws to a close, the National Trust has developed a position statement for foraging on our property. The gathering of wild food (plant/fungi/animal) from the countryside and seashore has a long tradition in the UK and can be a good way to make use of natural resources. The popularity of foraging has…

The importance of orchards….

Kea plums and their orchards are a wonderfully distinctive feature of the upper Fal estuary. Not only culturally and historically important, these spaces are a haven for a wide variety of wildlife. Over the last 50 years, most of the orchards around the river have disappeared with only a small area around the Coombe and…