Maintaining the paths in North Helford

After the wet weather last Winter and Spring, especially the volume of rain, the paths through the Carwinion valley and the Woodlands path at Nansidwell have been washed out and needed repairing. With the help of funding from the South West Coast Path association who raised a fantastic sum of money through the coast path walk earlier this…

Hay Meadows

Charlie has done a fantastic job cutting the paths through the hay meadows at Bosloe. With the views up and down the Helford River it makes a great walk in this weather!

Sea birds washed up along the coast

You may have heard about dead and sick seabirds being washed up along the south coast. The birds seem to have been affected by polyisobutylene (PIB). Two were found at Gyllyngvase at the weekend, so it is possible that more will be found locally.  If you find a live or dead stranded bird please report them immediately…

Oil Beetles

These distinctive, native beetles are in drastic decline due to habitat loss. Four species are thought to be extinct already and the four remaining species are listed for conservation action. Oil beetles are so called because they emit an oily substance when stressed. They are found in wildflower-rich sites, especially unimproved grasslands and woodland edges. …

Plantation Management

Monterey Pines have become characteristic of the stretch of the South West Coast Path on the northern bank of the Helford River. The plantations need to be actively managed, although it can seem quite a severe process. Left to their own devices, trees space themselves naturally. Thinning allows the strongest trees to establish more quickly…

Erosion of the Coast Path

The continuing heavy rain has caused further landslips on the coast path.  If you are thinking of getting out and about on the South West Coast Path over the Christmas & New Year break, please be careful and follow any diversions that have been set up.

Landslip

The recent foul weather has caused a large landslip at Rosemullion Head onto Prisk Cove beach below.  The cliff edge is very prone to erosion as it is very soft and over-lies a thick clay band. Due to the high levels of rain the ground was totally saturated and collapsed onto the beach almost as a…

Reaching the summit

Although the weather could have been kinder, work has continued apace. The obtuse angles created by the strings as they went around the turn, midway up the ascent caused a few problems. However, careful thought and the skill of Marc, our carpenter and chief designer, finally produced a continuous run on the strings, to which…

A step nearer to completion

Because these steps are very close to the cliff edge, digging in twelve securing posts has been really hard work. Each post needed to be sunk nearly a metre deep to prevent the steps sinking, which had happened to the previous set.  Under one hole we hit substantial bedrock, however with a great effort by…

Building on our expertise

Following our success with the construction of the Mawnan steps, the team has taken on the replacement of another set of steps further along the coast path at Durgan. Unlike our previous work, these steps consists of two timber sections with a 45 degree dogleg in the middle, plus a top section of stone risers…

Steps at Mawnan Completed!

Four days into the work the top step was put into place. The weather had been unusually kind to the construction team, allowing good progress to be made in laying the remainder of the 17 steps below the top one. With two treaders forming each step, another 34 needed to be inserted to complete the steps….