Nature Notes – Spring 2014

The first swallow of Spring arrived at Pill Farm on 5th April, that’s ten days earlier than the first one seen last year. While out early on Monday morning, looking over the coppiced wood a Nanphillows, I was lucky enough to hear a cuckoo, possibly over at Tregew, where there are lots of songbirds. That’s…

Scots Pine on the South Woodland Walk

The exceptional storms and rain over recent months have taken their toll on the trees at Trelissick. The sodden ground has loosened its grip on the root structures of our trees, particularly in the case of the shallow roots of conifers. Consequently, National Trust staff and volunteer crews have been frequently called to clear fallen or…

Winter

Apologies for the lack of blog material, the wet weather has made me reluctant to take my camera out and this blog has fallen by the wayside for a while. The wet and mild weather has been causing us a few problems with washed out paths and flooded fields, but our most significant loss happened…

Autumn at Trelissick Park

The recent spell of settled autumn weather has really brought out the colours of the trees in the parkland at Trelissick.  Even after the wild, wet and blustery weather some of the leaves are still on, especially the oak trees. There are still a few apples on the trees in the old orchard at Pill, but…

Sea birds washed up along the coast

You may have heard about dead and sick seabirds being washed up along the south coast. The birds seem to have been affected by polyisobutylene (PIB). Two were found at Gyllyngvase at the weekend, so it is possible that more will be found locally.  If you find a live or dead stranded bird please report them immediately…

Oil Beetles

These distinctive, native beetles are in drastic decline due to habitat loss. Four species are thought to be extinct already and the four remaining species are listed for conservation action. Oil beetles are so called because they emit an oily substance when stressed. They are found in wildflower-rich sites, especially unimproved grasslands and woodland edges. …

Barbastelle Bats

It has been a very exciting week as the birds are becoming more vocal in the early Spring weather as things start to warm up. Occasional mild evenings have seen the first emergence of roosting bats and we have a confirmed recording of a barbastelle bat on the estate. This is a small and rare…

Signs of Spring

Along with daffodils, campion, snowdrops and hawthorn we have seen the first cow parsley of the year in flower at Pill Farm. A beautiful little umbellifer which, on mass later in the Spring, is a real feature of Cornish lanes. The cold easterly wind is usually no use to man nor beast but this year…

Muddy Ducks

Lamouth Creek on the north side of the estate is a great place to observe wildfowl, especially at low tide. The other day I was walking along the north woodland walk where the creek was busy with many different species of birds feeding on the wide variety of molluscs and invertibrates which live in inter-tidal mud. The…

Life on the Carrick Roads

Great Northern Diver   Out on the Carrick Roads recently, in front of Trelissick park below Turnaware Point, I caught a glimpse of four Great Northern Divers or ‘Loons’ and a couple of Mergansers. Both these species come into the estuary for feeding and protection in winter. The Divers are usually further out to sea…